FedEx wants to equip its cargo planes with a laser-based missile defense system.

FedEx plans to equip its cargo planes with a laser-based missile defense system.

The FAA said Friday it was reviewing a FedEx proposal that would allow the company to install a laser-based missile defense system on its Airbus A321-200 jets.

According to the FAA, FedEx Corp sought approval in October 2019 to use a feature that emits infrared laser energy outside the aircraft as a countermeasure against heat-seeking missiles.

Installing these missiles would allow the parcel delivery company to fly into areas where it was previously forbidden to do so.

FedEx would need special authorization from the FAA because commercial cargo planes are generally not designed to carry and fire missiles, according to the FAA.

The agency said it was still reviewing the proposal and would take public comments into account when deciding whether to approve the installation of the missile.

For decades, the airline industry and a number of governments have fought the threat of shoulder-fired missiles known as man-portable air defense systems, or MANPADs, for airliners, some using infrared systems for targeting aircraft engines.

“In recent years, civilian aircraft have come under fire from man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS) in several overseas incidents,” according to FAA documents.

“As a result, several companies have developed and adapted systems such as a laser-based missile defense system for use on civilian aircraft to protect them from heat-seeking missiles.

“The FedEx Missile Defense System fires infrared laser energy at an incoming missile, disrupting the missile’s heat tracking.”

Before considering approving the system, the FAA proposed a set of conditions, including the inclusion of safety features.

The laser device must meet these requirements, including safeguards against accidental activation on the ground.

During flight, the device must not cause damage to any aircraft, including other aircraft, and it must not injure or injure any other passengers.

The FAA also wants to know about worker safety and maintenance, as well as airworthiness instructions for the craft and when it will be operational.

“Infrared laser energy can endanger people on the plane, on the ground, and on other planes,” the agency said.

“Because infrared light is invisible to the naked eye, the risk is increased.”

“Infrared laser energy can cause eye and skin damage, as well as impair a flight crew’s ability to control the aircraft.”

“Infrared laser energy can also affect other aircraft, both in the air and on the ground, as well as property, such as fuel trucks and airport equipment, in ways that…

Nokia news in brief

The FAA is considering a FedEx proposal after requesting the installation of a laser-based missile defense system on their cargo planes. The delivery company applied for approval in October 2019 in order to use their planes as a countermeasure against heat-seeking missiles called MANPADSIn addition, the installation of these missiles would allow the parcel delivery company to fly in otherwise restricted airspaces. The transportation agency is still reviewing the proposal and will provide an opportunity for the public to comment on whether or not to approve.

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